Are you finding that your quality of sleep is being compromised by your little bed-bugs?  Are you worried about your ability to function at your optimum when your sleep is constantly interrupted?

Co-sleeping can sound somewhat romantic to begin with, but the reality is often far from it.  Babies and children – as small as they are – seem to take up all the space in the bed.  (As if fighting for space with your spouse isn’t hard enough).  They move around a lot, make a fair bit of noise and always seem to be the ones that are the most comfortable while they’re sleeping.  When you’re trying everything in your power not to wake or disturb your child, are you sabotaging your own chances of a good night of sleep?

If you’re tired of having your sleep interrupted and are wanting to reclaim your bed, your privacy and space – here are a few helpful tips to achieve that.

Firstly – expect resistance.  Nobody reacts well to changes in their sleep routine, so there’s almost definitely going to be a period of adjustment.  Whether you have a baby who is used to your closeness or a toddler finding their way to your bed in the middle of the night, consistency will be the key to get through this period of adjustment.  Keep your cool as you walk your child back to their room.  Explain that they’re not allowed to sleep in your bed anymore and let them know what the consequence will be for doing it again.  (That is the warning).  The key is to then follow through with the consequence immediately once the rule has been violated in order for it to be effective.  A good example would be to close their bedroom door for a minute or two if they leave their room.

A good way to get your child on board is to create a reward system – make the incentive something that is of value to your child.  The timeframe needs to be fairly quick too so they don’t lose interest in achieving their goal.  I would suggest a daily reward rather than a weekly reward as they may not fully understand why they would have to wait so long.  (Preferably not sweets or food treats as rewards).

Another way to help with the transition is to wait with your child in their room while they fall asleep.  Not in bed with them, or rocking or singing etc.  Just quietly sitting beside their bed (on a comfortable chair) to reassure them that you are with them while they drift off.  Your goal would be to gradually reduce the amount of time that you stay in their room for, and before long they should be able to be put to bed and go to sleep independently.

There may be a few tears, but once baby gets used to sleeping on their own, they’ll soon prefer it. 

If you are in need of a helping hand to reclaim your bed, book a 15 minute Discovery Call to see how I can help you and your family to getting better sleep.

Sleep well,

Alison